Frommer 1910 Disassembly Video

I’ve been meaning to put this video together for a while, and finally have it – a detailed look at the mechanics and internal workings of the Frommer 1910. This was the third major iteration of Rudolf Frommer’s long-recoil locked-breech pistol design, and the most successful up to it’s time (although that isn’t saying much; fewer than 10,000 were made). It would hold that place for only two years before the 1912 Frommer Stop went into production and proved much more popular.

The 1910 model suffered from a number of problems that kept it from ever achieving real commercial success. It used a pretty wimpy cartridge, even by the standard of 1910. It was 7.65x13mm cartridge that pushed a 71gr bullet at about 820fps – roughly 80% the velocity of a the .32ACP. It was not a particularly ergonomic pistol, and it was far more complex than necessary for its cartridge, thanks to its rotating bolt and long recoil action. Of course, characteristics that made it a commercial disappointment also make it a pretty interesting gun to look at today:

I have a bit more information in the Vault regarding the other Frommer pistols (1901, 1906, and Stop), and Ed Buffaloe also has an excellent article on them.